Cover photo for Charles Arthur Forsberg's Obituary
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1933 Charlie 2024

Charles Arthur Forsberg

March 25, 1933 — June 16, 2024

Carlisle, Massachusetts

Carlisle, Massachusetts - Charles (Charlie) Arthur Forsberg, 91, long-time resident of Carlisle, passed away peacefully on June 16, surrounded by his family. Born on March 25, 1933, he was the son of Vendla A. and Bror A. Forsberg of Worcester.

Growing up along Indian Lake in Worcester, he developed a passion for skiing, hiking, and especially sailing – even building his own first sailboat. These interests were integral in forming many lifelong friendships, including meeting his future wife.

He graduated from high school in Worcester and went on to study electrical engineering at Northeastern University, graduating in 1957. After college, Charlie finished ROTC and attained a rank of US Army 2nd Lieutenant, serving in the reserves for six years. Professionally, Charlie worked at Hanscom Air Force Base for nearly 40 years, contributing to over-the-horizon radar programs, upper atmospheric ozone research, and space shuttle programs for NASA. In retirement, he managed Village Court and later served as its treasurer of the Board. He also loved to work at Great Brook Ski area.

During the 1950s and early 1960s, Charlie pursued his love for outdoor sports. In the summers, he competed in sailboat races globally with George O'Day and others, winning prestigious competitions such as The Prince of Wales Cup, the Princess Elizabeth Cup, and the U.S. Clifford Day Mallory Cup in 1957. He also was on the 5.5 Metre crew that won qualification for the Olympics in Naples in 1960.

During other seasons, he engaged in extensive hiking and skiing. In one year, he climbed all 48 4,000-footers in the White Mountain National Forest. He also regularly skied in Vermont and New Hampshire, including backcountry skiing at Mount Washington. Notably, Charlie was a pioneer in producing downhill ski films at New England locations such as Tuckerman Ravine.

In 1965, through sailing friends, Charlie met Joanne Lindstrom of Western Springs, Illinois, and they were later married on June 25, 1966. Together they raised four sons in Carlisle and were happily married for 58 years. In the 1970s, Charlie transitioned from racing sailboats to cruising with his family. Sailing out of Marion's Sippican Harbor, they explored many destinations around Buzzards Bay and Cape Cod, including Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, Newport, Cuttyhunk, Quissett, Woods Hole, and Hadley's Harbor.

Charlie was a devoted community member in Carlisle. While his children were growing up, he regularly volunteered as a coach for soccer, baseball, scouting, cross-country skiing, and Groton ski jumping programs. Charlie joined the Carlisle Colonial Minutemen in 1970 and remained active until Parkinson's Disease limited his participation. His volunteer Minuteman experiences spurred an interest in local history, leading him to serve as president of the Carlisle Historical Society for many years. He was instrumental in acquiring Heald House on Concord Street and developing it as a museum of Carlisle history. He also played a key role in managing the construction of the original Carlisle Castle in 1988. Charlie and Joanne were the Carlisle Honored Citizens at the Old Home Day celebration in 2012.

Charlie is survived by his wife, Joanne, and their children: Bob Forsberg of Tempe, Arizona; Scott Forsberg of Concord; Andy Forsberg of Leominster; and Jim Forsberg of Littleton. He also leaves behind four daughters-in-law and eight grandchildren.

A private service was held on June 18 at the Concord Funeral Home, Concord, Massachusetts. 

Gifts in Charlie's memory may be made to:
The Carlisle Historical Society
P.O. Box 703
Carlisle, MA 01741. 

 

Arrangements are under the care of Concord Funeral Home, 74 Belknap Street, Concord, MA 01742  978-369-3388 www.concordfuneral.com

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